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Naturalist Crosses the Lake (version 9.0)

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8-4-21 version 9.0

Source: Greater New Orleans Expressway Commission

A NATURALIST CROSSES

LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

By Robert A. (Bob) Thomas, Center for Environmental Communication, School of Mass Communication, and The Environment Program, Loyola University New Orleans (Certified Master Naturalist, Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater New Orleans Chapter) – rathomas@loyno.edu, 504-865-2107

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8-4-21 version 9.0

A NATURALIST CROSSES LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

Drive Down Bayou Lafourche

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Drive Down Bayou Lafourche
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10-17--21 Version 6.5

DRIVE DOWN BAYOU LAFOURCHE: A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF NATURAL HISTORY, ECONOMIC, AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF THE DRIVE FROM U.S. 90 TO GRAND ISLE, PORT FOURCHON, AND ELMER’S ISLAND, LOUISIANA

By Robert A. Thomas, Loyola Center for Environmental Communication, School of Communication & Design, Loyola University New Orleans, & Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater New Orleans (rathomas@loyno.edu, 504-865-2107)

Lines On Water: Langmuir Circulation- often a nature lover's destination

In 1927, as he sailed the Sargasso Sea, future Nobel Laureate Irving Langmuir observed and later explained the mechanics of parallel lines of sargassum floating on the sea surface.  These lines are now known as windrows resulting from Langmuir circulation, named in his honor for his description of the mechanisms that cause the lines to form and be maintained.

 

Tree Throws: Don't Overlook this Natural Resource

When walking the woods and swamps, one often finds where a tree has fallen over with the root system sticking into the air and a hole where the roots once resided.

This is called a tree throw.

The target of ecological studies, tree throws have yielded fascinating information, but in coastal Louisiana, they provide interesting habitats for the naturalist to explore.

Shoreline Sledge: Carex hyalinolepis

Something that all naturalists experience is finding a species that they don't know.  For the average person, it is impossible to know all of nature, and my challenge, and one of my loves, is plants.

I've walked the boardwalk at Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station, Southeastern Louisiana University's facility on Main Pass near Manchac, many times.

Ice Capades in Barataria

The title was the subject line in an email I received from Charles Butler, arborist and maintenance worker at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park & Preserve and Associate Certified Louisiana Master Naturalist.  His message contained the photos in this Nature Note.  I've never seen these beautiful, mysterious white items with my own eyes, but have known about them for years.

The Thrill of the Pursuit

Nature Notes
by Bob Thomas

One of the joys of being a scientist and/or naturalist is making new discoveries. As a naturalist, this is usually manifested in finding species I’ve never found before, observing critter activities I’ve never seen, or coming to understand events as I sharpen my skills in “reading the woods.”

Wood in Water

Delta Journal
by Bob Thomas

Folks often think of limbs and logs in water as obstructions, an undesirable condition. If there is any value, the wood is a nice place for turtles to sunbathe and for egrets to stealthily search for aquatic food.

Actually, wood is vitally important to the health of aquatic and marine ecosystems.