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Naturalist Crosses the Lake (version 9.0)

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8-4-21 version 9.0

Source: Greater New Orleans Expressway Commission

A NATURALIST CROSSES

LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

By Robert A. (Bob) Thomas, Center for Environmental Communication, School of Mass Communication, and The Environment Program, Loyola University New Orleans (Certified Master Naturalist, Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater New Orleans Chapter) – rathomas@loyno.edu, 504-865-2107

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8-4-21 version 9.0

A NATURALIST CROSSES LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

Drive Down Bayou Lafourche

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Drive Down Bayou Lafourche
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10-17--21 Version 6.5

DRIVE DOWN BAYOU LAFOURCHE: A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF NATURAL HISTORY, ECONOMIC, AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF THE DRIVE FROM U.S. 90 TO GRAND ISLE, PORT FOURCHON, AND ELMER’S ISLAND, LOUISIANA

By Robert A. Thomas, Loyola Center for Environmental Communication, School of Communication & Design, Loyola University New Orleans, & Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater New Orleans (rathomas@loyno.edu, 504-865-2107)

Beach Ghost Shrimp, Callichirus islagrande

Nature Notes
by Bob Thomas

There are many species of critters living along the beach front that are seldom seen, yet there is constant interesting evidence of their presence.

One such example is the beach ghost shrimp, Callichirus islagrande, a burrowing animal that seldom, if ever, exits its tunnels willingly. This species is endemic to the northern Gulf of Mexico and inhabits the high energy foreshore of barrier islands and similar stretches of quartzite sandy beaches.

Mole Crabs

Article Title
Mole Crabs, Delta Journal, Times Picayune, 5-4-08 C-9

Emerita Mole CrabDelta Journal

by Bob Thomas

It is easy to walk down a pretty sand beach, with waves sloshing back and forth, and imagine that there is little life along the edge of the sea. There is no vegetation growing – there is just sand.

Crawfish and Their Chimneys

Article Title
Crawfish & their chimneys, Louisiana Levant Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 3, p. 14, Summer 2007.

In the Wild
by Bob Thomas

There are many species of crawfish in Louisiana. Some are small, others are large. Some are rather drab in life, while some species are ornately colored with blues, reds, yellows, and greens.

Only a few species occur in our coastal wetlands; all are restricted to freshwater. Our most common species burrow during the late summer, spend most of the fall and winter underground in water filled tunnels, then move to open water (anything from roadside ditches to swamps, ponds, bayous, and lakes).